SafetyCube workshop on serious road injuries, The Hague – May 2016

Within SafetyCube, we develop detailed guidelines for the registration and monitoring of serious road injuries (MAIS3+ casualties). On May 24th, we organized a workshop in The Hague to present our preliminary guidelines and discuss how these guidelines could be further improved to meet all user needs. About 30 participants from 13 countries and organizations like ETSC and FEVR attended the workshop and provided feedback on the preliminary guidelines.

The workshop started with a welcome from Peter van der Knaap, managing director of SWOV Institute for road safety research, an introduction to the SafetyCube project by project coordinator Pete Thomas, a welcome from Maria Teresa Sanz-Villegas from the EC and an introduction to the guidelines.

Before discussing the preliminary guidelines into more detail, we discussed current and planned practices around Europe and how we could improve access to hospital data. In the afternoon we presented and discussed our detailed guidelines for each of the three ways described by the EC to estimate the number of serious road injuries: 1) applying correction factors to police data , 2) use of hospital data, and 3) linking police data and hospital data. Finally, we presented and discussed our preliminary conclusions regarding the comparability of the different methods.

SafetyCube Collaborates with Partner Projects – April 2016

Part of the SafetyCube project activities is to explore collaboration with other Horizon 2020 projects funded in the same call in 2014. During the TRA conference held in Warsaw, SafetyCube initiated an informal meeting of the five project teams: XCYCLE, InDeV, SENIORS, PROSPECT, and SafetyCube. The results of the meeting and an associated conference session is documented in SafetyCube deliverable D1.1 “Collaboration with other H2020 projects”.

The deliverable provides presentation material from all projects and describes the initial collaboration activities among the projects. The earlier collaboration between SafetyCube and InDeV on injury costs will continue and should expand to also include methodologies to investigate underreporting of serious injuries.

Plans for further liaisons for the project groups includes:

  1. A joint session to present the projects to be held at the International Cycle Safety 
Conference in Bologna in November 2016
  2. Invitations to WP Leaders from other projects to attend the SafetyCube Mid-term 
workshop to take place in Brussels in September 2016.
  3. Further discussions between WP Leaders from SafetyCube and other projects on 
potential areas of cooperation.

The deliverable can be downloaded from:

pdf D1.1 Collaboration with other projects with presentations

SafetyCube Participates at TRA – April 2016

SafetyCube was part of the Transport Research Arena (TRA) conference activities with presentations in both a formal session and the exhibition area. A session of invited speakers presented five H2020 projects: InDeV, PROSPECT, SafetyCube, SENIORS, and XCYCLE.  The session, chaired by SafetyCube coordinator Pete Thomas, was well attended. Prof. George Yannis and Eleonora Papadimitriou presented the project and participated in an active discussion period afterwards. SafetyCube was also presented by Rob Thomson in the European Commission Market Place “Speakers Corner” in the conference exhibition area.

The TRA conference provided an opportunity for the five projects consortia to meet and exchange information. SafetyCube has already links to the InDeV project through an earlier workshop and this cooperation is planned to continue.

The presentation is currently available:

pdfSafetyCube TRA 2016 Presentation Yannis

SafetyCube Road Safety for Policymakers – March 2016

An article on SafetyCube project by Concetta Durso, Project Manager of ERF, was published in the specialised magazine “World Highways”.

The general framework of the SafetyCube project and its objectives were presented. Focus was given to the SafetyCube Stakeholder Workshop which took place in Brussels in February 2016. The objectives and the activities during the Workshop were presented and the expected outcomes and future developments were discussed.

The article is currently available:

pdfSafetyCube Road Safety for Policymakers World Highways March 2016

SafetyCube Plenary Meeting, Barcelona – March 2016

On March 1-3, 2016, SafetyCube partners gathered in Barcelona to discuss the progress and next steps of the SafetyCube project.

Within SafetyCube’s methodology workpackage, guidelines for literature search and for summarizing research results – including meta-analysis – have been developed, which together with the revised template for coding research studies, ensures a uniform way of addressing different risks and measures in different areas of interest. That way it will be possible to perform overall quantitative analyses over studies that are otherwise hardly comparable. First results are planned to become available late autumn 2016.

Moreover, behavior, infrastructure and vehicle workpackages discussed the specific issues and particularities involved in each field.

A major part of the discussions was dedicated on the design and the functionalities of the SafetyCube Decision Support System (DSS), on the basis of the feedback from stakeholders received so far during the various SafetyCube workshops, as well as on the so far experiences from the analyses carried out within SafetyCube.

SafetyCube Stakeholder Workshop, Brussels – February 2016

On February 22nd, 2016, the SafetyCube project held a workshop for European road infrastructure stakeholders in Brussels. The objectives of the workshop were to present the project activities to date and plans for the coming research steps, and to receive feedback from stakeholders concerning:

  • user needs for the DSS to make it useful – also over time: what information is needed? how should it be presented? how could the system be accessed?, etc.
  • “hot topics” on infrastructure safety so that the DSS addresses key issues, e.g. policy and research priorities, areas in need of cost-benefit analysis or evidence, etc.

The workshop started with presentations of the SafetyCube project and the SafetyCube approach on road infrastructure risks and measures. Then, during a discussion session, the participants gave detailed feedback on their wishes and questions on the DSS. Thereafter, the participants were asked to prioritize the infrastructure “hot topics”. This was done on five posters showing the “hot topics”. The workshop concluded with a synthesis of the discussions.

The collected feedback is very important for SafetyCube and our further work and we would like to thank all participants for their contribution.

Minutes and presentations from the day are available below.

pdfSafetyCube Workshop Brussels February 2016 Agenda

pdfSafetyCube Workshop Brussels February 2016 Minutes

pdfSafetyCube Workshop Brussels February 2016 Infrastructure Risk Factors and Measures

pdfSafetyCube Workshop Brussels February 2016 Synthesis

 

Liaison between SafetyCube and InDeV on the determination of crash costs – January 2016

A Decision Support System for road safety stakeholders is being developed in SafetyCube. One important feature of this tool would be to facilitate Cost Benefit Analyses. Hence, SafetyCube will provide guidelines for the determination of crash costs and will determine crash costs for all EU member states. Specific attention is paid to the costs of serious road injuries. InDeV, another Horizon 2020 project, also aims to collect information on costs of crashes in different EU countries. To make sure decision makers have the best available information and to prevent sending two similar questionnaires to crash costs experts in EU member states, the two projects decided to work together.

Crash costs experts from SafetyCube and InDeV had a very fruitful first meeting together on January 28th in The Hague and decided to liaise on the collection of information on costs of crashes. We will have additional joint meetings in the future.

SafetyCube Presentation at TRB Annual Meeting – January 2016

The SafetyCube project was presented by Eleonora Papadimitriou at the Transportation Research Board (TRB) 95th Annual Meeting, which was held in Washington, D.C., in 10-14 January 2016. The presentation included the main objectives, as well as the general concept of the SafetyCube project and the related European Road Safety Decision Support System under development.

The presentation is currently available:

pdf SafetyCube TRB Presentation Papadimitriou

 

SafetyCube Il Notiziario – January 2016

An article on SafetyCube project by Concetta Durso, Project Manager of ERF, was published in the Italian specialised magazine “Strade & Autostrade”.

The progress of the SafetyCube project regarding the identification of user needs for the planned Decision Support System (DSS) and “the hot topics” that should be addressed in the DSS is presented. Special focus is given to the SafetyCube Stakeholder Workshop, which took place in Brussels in June 2015, including the objectives, the activities and the results of this Workshop. Reference is also made to the second SafetyCube Stakeholder Workshop, held in Ljubljana in October 2015 and to the activities that took place based on the results of the previous Workshop.

The article is currently available:

pdfSafetyCube Il Notiziario – Strade&Autostrade – January 2016

 

SafetyCube Road Safety Priority Topics Survey Results- December 2015

The results of the Survey on Road Safety Priority Topics ranking per category are available below and are constantly updated:

A1. Infrastructure
1 Self-explaining and forgiving roads
2 Enforcement by police or cameras
3 Implementing user accepted speed limits
4 Removing or obstacles without passive safety protection from the roadside
5 Improved road lighting
6 Effective road markings
7 Identifying critical   maintenance operations
8 Developing dynamic speed limits
9 Minimizing highway speed limit differences among countries
A2. Vehicle
1 Advanced driver support systems and active safety
2 Greater passive safety for vehicle occupants and vulnerable road users
3 Active and passive safety of heavy goods vehicles
4 Integrating semi-automated driving without compromising driving skills
5 Developing E-bike safety Strategies
6 Technologies in the “driverless car” field
7 Reducing conflicts caused by silent electric cars
A3. Road Users (General)
1 Enforcement of existing rules
2 Effects of mobile phone use
3 Understanding causes of serious injuries
4 Safety education programs (especially children)
5 Eliminating driver aggression – recklessness and intended
6 Support safe mobility of elderly car drivers
7 Counteracting driving fatigue
8 Graduated licensing and mandatory continuous education
9 Strategies for young drivers: restrictions vs. mobility
10 Assessing fitness to drive (from fatigue to health)
11 Improving safety programs for elderly road users
12 Improving post-crash care systems
13 Investigate the effects of (new/different) types of drugs (especially on young drivers)
14 Link information between road safety and health sector
15 Link indicators for road safety and environment
A4. Vulnerable Road Users (VRUs)
1 Improved power-Two-Wheeler safety
2 Improved pedestrian crossing design
3 Improved bicycles infrastructure at crossroads and roundabouts
4 Promoting bicycle helmet use (better education and acceptable solutions)
5 Dedicated bicycle routes
6 Strategies for the growing share of elderly road users
7 Safe mobility for disabled people
8 Introducing shared space, 20/30km/h zones
9 Reducing single bicycle crashes
10 Improving safety of VRUs in emerging economies
11 Reducing the under-reporting of pedestrian and cyclist accidents
12 Understanding the safety implications of phone and handheld devices by cyclists and pedestrians
13 Reducing bicycle collisions with parked cars / car doors
14 Develop strategies for VRUs for increasing Automation
15 Cyclist interaction with E-bikes/pedelecs
A5. Data
1 Creating sources of detailed exposure data
2 Introducing better reporting of contributing factors in accident reports
3 Identify sources for incident/near miss data
4 Resolve issues of privacy and data protection for better data access
5 Access to E-call records
A6. Safety Management
1 Increased availability of cost-effectiveness of road safety measures
2 Improve recording the quality of safety measure implementation
3 Applying demerit point system for driver’s licenses
4 Exploit the influence of new information technologies (e.g. from police patrols)
5 Work Vision Zero principles
6 Improved use of public / social media for communicating road safety
7 Promote road safety programs in companies/organisations
8 Introduce “Pay as you drive” incentives/penalties for safe driving
9 Quantify the cost effectiveness of campaigns
10 Promote “Pay as you drive” based on exposure, type of road network

SafetyCube Road Safety Priority Topics Survey – December 2015

In view of developing the European Road Safety Decision Support System (DSS) within the European Commission co-financed research project SafetyCube, all European road safety experts and stakeholders interested are invited to participate at our survey which is available via the SafetyCube Project website and rank the “Road Safety Priority Topics” to be included at the DSS. All the results of this survey will be constantly made available at this website.

Start the survey now:

SafetyCube Road Safety Priority Topics Survey

SafetyCube Plenary Meeting, Gothenburg – November 2015

On 10 November 2015, SafetyCube’s behavioural, infrastructure and vehicle experts gathered in Gothenburg to receive an in-depth training for coding road safety literature. The coding exercise is the basis for an evidence-based, quantified overview of risk factors in road traffic as well as the effectiveness of countermeasures. This will be one of the main building blocks of the Decision Support System, SafetyCube’s main outcome.

The training, supported by extensive written guidelines, focused on the many research designs that are used in road safety studies, their potential biases and, hence, the conclusions that can be drawn or cannot be drawn from a study. Within SafetyCube’s methodology workpackage an interactive excel-based coding template had been developed which ensures a uniform way of coding different studies in different areas of interest. That way it will be possible to perform overall quantitative analyses over studies that are otherwise hardly comparable. First results are planned to become available late autumn 2016.

SafetyCube progress of activities concerning road user behaviour – November 2015

SafetyCube’s work package 4 aims at identifying risks and measures which are related to road user behaviour (like driving under influence, not wearing protective devices or road safety campaigns measure wise). In order to facilitate the Decision Support System risk factors and counter-measures will be assessed regarding accident contribution and effectiveness.

In a first step it is important to identify all kind of risk factors and possible measures and list them exhaustively. WP4 has received and processed valuable input on that from stakeholder workshops.

In parallel, the process of drafting an three-level taxonomy of risks and measures has started and topics like distraction, drunk driving, speeding etc. have been assigned to involved partner organisations preliminarily. Since not all road user related risk factors are tackled by a road user related measure (e.g. ignition interlocks to prevent drunk driving) work on that is coordinated with WP 5, 6.

Furthermore, studies on various related topics are being preselected in this phase of the project.

SafetyCube progress of activities concerning serious road injuries – October 2015

Serious road injuries and their costs are dealt in Work Package 7. The main objectives are to:

  1. Assess and improve the estimation of the numbers of serious road injuries (Task 7.1)
  2. Determine and quantify health impacts of serious road injuries (Task 7.2)
  3. Estimate economic and immaterial costs related to serious road injuries (Task 7.3)
  4. Identify key risk factors related to serious injuries and their health impacts (Task 7.4)

The first months of the project we have been working at Tasks 7.1 and 7.2.

Regarding Task 7.1 we decided at the kick-off meeting to tune our activities as much as possible to activities of for example the CARE experts group, IRTAD and FERSI. Instead of circulating our own questionnaire, we will make use of existing information as much as possible and we will focus our attention on completing the information for all EU countries. On the basis of results from case studies, analyzing data from Spain, The Netherlands, the UK, France, Belgium and Slovenia, we will provide guidelines for the determination of the number of serious road injuries. On the moment we are working on a proposal for the research questions that should be answered by the case studies.

Regarding Task 7.2, we discussed a format for case studies describing health impacts of (serious) injuries during our Telcon in September. We are now working on these case studies, including information from France, Germany, Spain, the UK and Belgium.

SafetyCube stakeholder workshop, Ljubljana – October 2015

SafetyCube organized on October 14th 2015 a successful workshop hosted by AVP in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The first part of the workshop was a plenary session with about 150 participants from the Slovenian Road Safety Councils and IRTAD meeting. The SafetyCube project was presented as well as the plans for the Road Safety Decision Support System (DSS) and the “hot topics” from previous workshop. All participants were asked to give their feedback to the DSS and “hot topics”. Feedback was collected both in spoken and written form.

 

The second part of the workshop was a breakout session continuing with participants from the IRTAD group. The breakout session started with a discussion where the 23 participants were giving more detailed feedback on their wishes and questions on the DSS. Thereafter the participants were asked to add, comment and prioritize the “hot topics”. This was done on six posters showing the “hot topics” from previous stakeholder consultation.

 

The collected feedback is very important for SafetyCube and our further work and we would like to thank all participants for your contribution!

 

Minutes and presentations from the day are available below.

pdfSafetyCube workshop Ljubljana 20151014 minutes

pdfSafetyCube Workshop Ljubljana George Yannis

pdfSafetyCube Workshop Ljubljana Heike Martensen

pdfSafetyCube Workshop Ljubljana Klaus Machata

SafetyCube Presentation at CARE Experts Meeting – October 2015

A general presentation of the SafetyCube Project was given by Prof. George Yannis at the CARE Experts meeting of the European Commission, which was held on 8th October 2015 in Brussels.  Special emphasis was given to the objectives and the work programme of SafetyCube project regarding serious injuries and their costs.

The presentation is currently available:

pdf SafetyCube CARE Experts Meeting Yannis

SafetyCube Al servizio della sicurezza – October 2015

An article on SafetyCube project by Concetta Durso was published in the Italian specialised magazine “Le Strade”.

The general framework of the SafetyCube project and its objectives were presented. Focus was given to the SafetyCube Stakeholder Workshop which took place in Brussels in June 2015. The objectives and the activities during the Workshop were presented and the expected outcomes and future developments were discussed.

The article is currently available:

pdfSafetyCube-Al servizio della sicurezza-Le Strade-October 2015

SafetyCube progress of the methodology development – September 2015

The development and validation of the methodological framework is carried out within Work Package 3 , which will be implemented by the other Work Packages  (WP4 – behaviour, WP5 – infrastructure, WP6 – vehicle) .

As important first step and basis for the Decision Support System, it was agreed that Work Packages 4-6 should systematically collect and record studies evaluating risk factors and countermeasures. To record all studies in one system, they have all to be coded according to the same system. This turned out to be a big challenge, and the first attempts before the summer vacation had shown clear problems to deal with so many different types of studies and nevertheless achieve a registration that can be used as the basis for summaries and analyses.

During the Technical Meeting, on September 14, the new template and second coding exercise were thoroughly evaluated. While we were quite happy with the progress made, we also realized that next to some improvements on the template, we will have to supply very thorough training and instruction. The guidelines for the analysis of risk factors and evaluation of counter measures, which we have already started to produce since the beginning of the project, were restructured to be more focused on the task at hand, to enable SafetyCube partners to “dissect” studies they read: to understand the underlying design, code the results in the appropriate form, and judge the presence of possible biases.

By end of October, the guidelines and coding template will be finalized and distributed to the wider partnership. On the basis of studies supplied by each of the leaders of WP 4-7, a large scale training session at the November meeting in Gothenburg will be organised.

SafetyCube progress of dissemination and consultation activities – September 2015

All SafetyCube dissemination and stakeholder consultations activities are coordinated by SAFER within Work Package 2. An intensive start up period was experienced with planning and implementing the first stakeholder workshop in the second month of the project (Brussels, June 2015). All activities and results were summarized into the first deliverable of SafetyCube – Definition of user needs and “hot topics. In parallel, project material like project logo, presentation and deliverable templates were developed. The website was launched in August 2015 and will be updated and improved continuously during the project.

In the near future a deliverable describing the project dissemination plan will be finalised. A second workshop is also planned to take place in connection to the IRTAD meeting in Ljubljana, Slovenia in October 14th, 2015. This workshop will further set the priorities and “hot topics” for the development of the SafetyCube European Road Safety Decision Support System.

Safetycube Stakeholder Workshop, Brussels – June 2015

Safetycube Website Launched – August 2015

Safetycube Stakeholder Workshop, Ljubljana – October 2015

SafetyCube definition of user needs and hot topics – August 2015

“SafetyCube Deliverable 2.1 Definition of user needs and hot topics” is now available as a result of the Work Package 2 activities.

The purpose of this report is to define user needs for the planned Decision Support System (DSS) and “hot topics” to be used as demonstrators in the project. A kick-off workshop was planned for the second month of the SafetyCube project to quickly engage stakeholders and identify key research topics addressing road safety.

The first goal of the workshop was to identify the requirements for a Decision Support System based on the needs of the intended end users. The second goal was to identify current and/or high priority issues that should be addressed in a DSS. These “hot topics” could be specific risk factors, safety effects, and cost-benefit analyses to be examined within the project. This consultation will ensure that the SafetyCube project is correctly oriented to address relevant road safety issues as well as establish examples for testing the DSS once completed.

This deliverable is an input to the technical work packages (WP3-WP8) of the project and is not a definitive analysis of the workshop results. The information gathered from the stakeholders must be reviewed separately in each work package to orient their specific activities.

The Deliverable is available below:

pdfSafetyCube Deliverable 2.1 Definition of user needs and hot topics